polaroid folding roll-film cameras
models 80, 95, 100, 110, 120, 150, 160, 700, 800, 850, 900, J33 & J66




Model 150 and Model 80A converted to 120 roll-film.


Film for Polaroid Roll-Film Cameras

You cannot buy it, so dont ask. The last of the Polaroid Roll-Films were discontinued in 1992. The only way to use these cameras is to convert them to use a currently available film. They can be made to use 35mm film, 120 roll-film, 4x5 sheet film, Polaroid 600 film, Polaroid 2.875"x3.75" Pack-Film, (and Possibly Polaroid Captiva film). If you DO happen to run into some Polaroid Type 40, or Type 30 film on ebay, dont waste your money on it. Polaroid films cannot be refrigerated and do not last long in storage as the developing chemicals go bad. Also Type 40 films required a coating which fixes and hardens the film so that the image doesnt fade or get scratched easily. You can load individual sheets of sheet-film or photographic paper into these cameras in a darkroom or changing bag without doing any modifications... for people who have access to a darkroom and simply want to play with these cameras this is that way to go. You can also load 120 roll-film into these cameras without modifications and advance the film in the darkroom. Scroll down for links to publicly available conversions.


Using Flash with Polaroid Roll-Film Cameras

Another lost cause in the world of Polaroid Roll-Film Cameras. With the exception of the 110A, 110B and 120, all Polaroid cameras that I know of use a proprietary flash synch thats only works with Polaroid flash stuff. Also fun is the fact that the Polaroid accessory shoe/hot shoe is a non-standard size as well. Meaning you cannot even mount non-Polaroid accessories or flashes to the camera! Even if you COULD use flash with these cameras, they require Bulb flash, a modern Electronic flash simply will not work with the shutters of most of these cameras. This is because there is a slight delay in the shutter with cameras designed for bulb flashes, modern Electronic flashes fire instantly and so the flash will be over before the shutter is even open on these cameras. As an alternative to Bulb flashes, Polaroid offered the Wink Light, an Electronic flash which stays on longer than most Electronic flashes do. If you wish to use the flash shoe as an accessory shoe, you will have to remove the Polaroid shoe and add a standard accessory shoe, this is a recommened hack for this camera. Also, if you wish to use an old Bulb flash you can replace the Polaroid shoe with an old style Hot Shoe.


Accessorizing Your Polaroid

Because a vast majority of the roll-film Polaroids have the same size lens, most of them accept 32mm push-on filters. This is cool because if you happen to find filters, they should fit almost any Polaroid roll-film camera you have. The exceptions are the Models 110, 110A, 110B, 120, J66 and J33. In addition to the typical yellow and blue contrast filters, Polaroid also sold a Close-Up Filter kit and a special Neutral Density Filter. The ND Filter allowed you to use 3000 speed film in bright daylight. The Close-Up kit includes 3 close-up filter lenses and a tape measure. The tape measure includes markings for using different combinations of the lenses stacked. Polaroid sold various flashes, flash brackets and the electronic Wink Light for these cameras. For the J66 and J33, Polaroid released a Twin-Image Gimmick which turns any scene into a Stereo 3D image on one print. Do not be surprised if the accessories for these cameras cost more than the cameras, some of them are quite collectible.


The Polaroid Roll-Film Shutter

Most of the Polaroid Roll-Film cameras use a shutter which has shutter speeds and apertures linked to one dial. The exceptions are the Models 110, 120, J66 and J33. This was a popular system used by many camera makers, especially for consumer-level cameras to simplify the photographic process. It was called the Exposure Value system, or EV. The Models 110A and 110B use a combination of conventional shutter speeds and EV numbers. The Models 850 and 900 use electronic, automatic shutters with manual override using EV numbers.

Webpage about EV Numbers and the Zone System

Polaroid used two variations of this system for setting the synched shutter and aperture for different models of cameras:

LV: The earliest Polaroid cameras used a system called the Polaroid Light Value system, also called Polaroid Numbers. This system seems to have been phased out around 1957. It was used on the Models 95, 95A, 100, 700 and the 80. Because of the limited shutter of the Model 80, it used its own separate combinations. The Polaroid Light Value system is the same as the Exposure Value number minus 9. Here are the aperture and shutter speed combinations of each LV number:

LV: Model 95:

1 : f11 @ 1/8
2 : f11 @ 1/15
3 : f11 @ 1/30
4 : f11 @ 1/60
5 : f16 @ 1/60
6 : f22 @ 1/60
7 : f32 @ 1/60
8 : f45 @ 1/60

LV: Models 95A, 100, 700:

1 : f8.8 @ 1/12
2 : f8.8 @ 1/25
3 : f8.8 @ 1/50
4 : f8.8 @ 1/100
5 : f12.5 @ 1/100
6 : f17.5 @ 1/100
7 : f25 @ 1/100
8 : f35 @ 1/100

LV: Model 80:

2 : f8.8 @ 1/25
3 : f12.5 @ 1/25
4 : f8.8 @ 1/100
5 : f12.5 @ 1/100
6 : f17.5 @ 1/100
7 : f25 @ 1/100
8 : f35 @ 1/100
9 : f50 @ 1/100

EV: After 1957, all the Polaroid Folding Roll-Film cameras used the EV system except for the Models 120, J66 and J33. The later Models 80A and 80B use the EV system, again adjusted to compensate for the limited shutter speeds. Here are the aperture and shutter speed combinations of each EV number:

EV: Models 95B, 150, 160, 800:

10 : f8.8 @ 1/12
11 : f8.8 @ 1/25
12 : f8.8 @ 1/50
13 : f8.8 @ 1/100
14 : f12.5 @ 1/100
15 : f17.5 @ 1/100
16 : f25 @ 1/100
17 : f35 @ 1/100

EV: Models 80A/B:

11 : f8.8 @ 1/25
12 : f12.5 @ 1/25
13 : f8.8 @ 1/100
14 : f12.5 @ 1/100
15 : f17.5 @ 1/100
16 : f25 @ 1/100
17 : f35 @ 1/100
18 : f50 @ 1/100

I make a cheat-sheet when I go out on a shoot so I know what settings im looking at... its good to tape the cheat-sheet to the back of the film-door so you dont loose it! To make metering faster I also make a reference scale to one specific aperature or shutter speed. Lets say I set my light meter to f8.8... then looking at the speeds I know which EV number to choose.... or alternatively setting the light meter to 1/100th of a second you get your reading for the appropriate f-stop:

EV: Shutter Speed @ f8.8:

10 : 1/12
11 : 1/25
12 : 1/50
13 : 1/100
14 : 1/200
15 : 1/400
16 : 1/800
17 : 1/1600
18 : 1/3200

or...

EV: Aperature @ 1/100 sec:

10 : f3.2
11 : f4.4
12 : f6.3
13 : f8.8
14 : f12.5
15 : f17.5
16 : f25
17 : f35
18 : f50


Websites about Polaroid Cameras


You can find most of this information on the following websites, I have simply combined information from these sites with my own experience to make this list:

- The Land List
Organized by film type and camera style, this is the most comprehensive Polaroid resource online.

- Jim's Polaroid Camera Collection
Mostly about Pack-Film cameras.

- The PhotoWorkshops Partnership Collection: POLAROID
Not an intuitive site... when you are viewing the page for a particular model, click on the name of that model to get detailed information about it. All about the Roll-Film cameras.


Conversions


So even after reading all of this, you are still convinced you should shoot film with this beautiful camera of yours? Of course you are! Like me, you are probably either obstinant or inventive, or preferably a good measure of both! Now recently, several people have attempted to procure patents for converting Polaroid Roll-Film cameras to 4x5 films. This is really unfortunate because it means you risk receiving nasty letters if you publish instructions for this online. So here are some ways to use your Polaroid Roll-Film camera with modern films, please contact me if you would like your webpage added to this list!:

The Land List : How To page

The Land List : Polaroid Roll-Film to Polaroid Pack-Film conversion

My instructions on Polaroid 150 to 120 roll-film conversion

My instructions on Polaroid 80A to 120 roll-film conversion

Diwan Bhathal's non-patented Polaroid Roll-Film to 4x5 conversion


Overview of Features


These traits are common to the following camera Models:
80, 80A, 80B, 95, 95A, 95B, 100, 150, 160, 700, 800, 850, 900:

- Die-cast aluminum body
- Hinged folding design that protects lens
- Plasticized cloth bellows
- Round corners on the film-gate
- 3-Element glass lens with 32mm push-on filters
- Polaroid shutter using LV or EV numbers

Viewfinder Types:

- Folding viewfinder: 95, J66
- Folding viewfinder with wire parallax guide: 95A, 95B, 100, 110, 700
- Rigid viewfinder: 80, 80A, 80B, J33
- Viewfinder with parallax correction: 110A, 120, 150, 160, 800, 850
- Viewfinder with parallax correction and combined rangefinder: 110B, 900

Focusing Types:

- Zone focus: J66, J33
- Scale focus: 80, 80A, 80B, 95, 95A, 95B, 100
- Uncoupled rangefinder: 700
- Coupled rangefinder: 110, 110A, 110B, 120, 150, 160, 800, 850, 900

Shutter Control Types:

- LV Polaroid numbers on shutter: 80, 95, 95A, 100, 700,
- EV numbers on shutter: 80A, 80B, 95B, 150, 160, 800
- Conventional shutter: 110, 120
- Conventional shutter and EV numbers: 110A, 110B
- Auto-exposure with manual override: 850, 900
- Auto-exposure no manual override: J66, J33

Recognizing Model # by Color:

- Brown crackle paint: 80A, 80B, J33
- Brown faux leather covering: 95, 95A, 95B, GOMZ Moment
- Dark brown covering: 850
- Grey-green covering: 700, 800
- Grey crackle paint: 80
- Grey covering: J66
- Dark grey covering: 110A, 110B, 120, 150, 160, 900
- Black covering: 100, 110

- Tan top plate: 80A, 80B, 800, 850, J33
- Light olive top plate: 80
- Grey top plate: J66 (flat no windows)
- Dark grey top plate: 110A, 110B, 120, 150, 160, 900

- Light grey-green bellows: 700
- Light grey bellows: 800
- Grey bellows: J66
- Dark grey bellows: 900
- Black bellows: 80, 80A, 80B, 95, 95A, 95B, 100, 110, 110A, 110B, 120, 150, 160, 850, J33, GOMZ Moment


Details on Models


LARGE FORMAT
Type 40 Film: 3.25" x 4.25"
Actual Image Size: 2.875" x 3.75"

MODEL 95: 1948-1953

- Lens: 135mm f/11, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/8-1/60th, set by dial with LV numbers
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder
- Focus: scale focus by lever
- Covering: brown faux leather
- Bellows: black

MODEL 95A "Speedliner": 1954-1957

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with LV numbers
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder with wire frame for parallax
- Focus: scale focus by lever
- Covering: brown faux leather
- Bellows: black

MODEL 95B "Speedliner": 1957-1961

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with EV numbers
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder with wire frame for parallax
- Focus: scale focus by lever
- Covering: brown faux leather
- Bellows: black

MODEL 100 "One Hundred": 1954-1957
(Heavy-duty industrial version of 95A)

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet (stricter manufacturing)
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with LV numbers
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder with wire frame for parallax
- Focus: scale focus by lever
- Covering: black or dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: black

MODEL 700 "The 700": 1955-1957

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with LV numbers
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder with wire frame for parallax
- Focus: focus by lever, uncoupled Kalart rangefinder mounted on top
- Covering: grey-green textured plastic
- Bellows: light grey-green

GOMZ Moment: 1952-1954
(Russian copy, is very rare)

- Lens: 135mm f/6.8, T-26 glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/10-1/200, conventional speeds
- Viewfinder: folding sportsfinder on top, reflex viewfinder on lens board
- Focus: scale focus by lever
- Covering: brown faux leather
- Bellows: black

...

MODEL 110 "Pathfinder": 1952-1957

- Lens: 127mm f/4.5, Wollensak Raptar
- Shutter: Wollensak Rapax, speeds 1-1/400, B, T, conventional speeds
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder with wire frame for parallax
- Focus: focus by knob on bottom of door, coupled Kalart rangefinder mounted on top
- Covering: black textured plastic
- Bellows: black

MODEL 110A "Pathfinder": 1957-1960

- Lens: 127mm f/4.7, Rodenstock Ysarex
- Shutter: Prontor SVS, speeds 1-1/300, B, conventional speeds and EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by knob on bottom of door
- Top Plate: dark grey plastic with separate windows for viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: black

MODEL 110B "Pathfinder": 1960-1964

- Lens: 127mm f/4.7, Rodenstock Ysarex
- Shutter: Prontor SVS, speeds 1-1/300, B, conventional speeds and EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder, with brightlines and combined rangefinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by knob on bottom of door
- Top Plate: dark grey plastic with one window for combined viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: black

MODEL 120: 1957-1960
(International version made by Yashica)

- Lens: 127mm f/4.7, Yashinon
- Shutter: Seikosha-SLV, speeds 1-1/500, B
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by knob on bottom of door
- Top Plate: dark grey plastic with separate windows for viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: black

...

MODEL 150: 1957-1960

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by knob on bottom of door
- Top Plate: dark grey plastic with separate windows for viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: black

MODEL 160: 1962-1965
(International version of 150 made by Yashica)

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by knob on bottom of door
- Top Plate: dark grey plastic with separate windows for viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: black

MODEL 800 "The 800": 1957-1962

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet (stricter manufacturing)
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/100, set by dial with EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by knob on bottom of door
- Top Plate: tan plastic with separate windows for viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: grey-green textured plastic
- Bellows: light grey

...

MODEL 850: 1961-1963

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/600, set electronically by CdS cell or manually by EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by wheel at corner of bed
- Top Plate: tan plastic with separate windows for viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark brown textured plastic
- Bellows: black
- Batteries: PX625 1.35v mercury (replace with 1.35v 675 Zinc-Air hearing aid batteries)

MODEL 900: 1960-1963

- Lens: 130mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/12-1/600, set electronically by CdS cell or manually by EV numbers
- Viewfinder: parallax corrected viewfinder, with brightlines and combined rangefinder
- Focus: rangefinder focus by wheel at corner of bed
- Top Plate: dark grey plastic with one window for combined viewfinder and rangefinder
- Covering: dark grey textured plastic
- Bellows: dark grey
- Batteries: PX625 1.35v mercury (replace with 1.35v 675 Zinc-Air hearing aid batteries)

...

MODEL J66: 1961-1963

- Lens: 114mm f/19, plastic meniscus
- Shutter: pneumatic rotary, speeds 1/15-1/1000, automatic by selenium cell no manual override
- Viewfinder: folding viewfinder, with brightlines
- Focus: 2 position zone focus
- Top Plate: grey plastic, flat no windows
- Covering: grey textured plastic
- Bellows: grey, self erecting scissor struts
- Film: 3000 speed B&W only


MEDIUM FORMAT
Type 30 Film: 2.5" x 3.25"
Actual Image Size: 2.125" x 2.875"

MODEL 80 "Highlander": 1954-1957

- Lens: 100mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/25 and 1/100, set by dial with LV numbers
- Viewfinder: rigid viewfinder
- Focus: scale focus by rotating front of lens
- Top Plate: light olive plastic with window for viewfinder
- Covering: grey crackle paint
- Bellows: black, self erecting struts
- Shutter Top: light grey paint

MODEL 80A "Highlander": 1957-1959

- Lens: 100mm f/8.8, glass triplet
- Shutter: speeds 1/25 and 1/100, set by dial with EV numbers
- Viewfinder: rigid viewfinder
- Focus: scale focus by rotating front of lens
- Top Plate: tan plastic with window for viewfinder
- Covering: dark brown crackle paint
- Bellows: black, self erecting struts
- Shutter Top: light beige paint

MODEL 80B "Highlander": 1959-1961
(Same as 80A with film transport differences)

...

MODEL J33: 1961-1963

- Lens: 101mm f/19, plastic meniscus
- Shutter: pneumatic rotary, speeds 1/15-1/1000, automatic by selenium cell no manual override
- Viewfinder: rigid viewfinder
- Focus: 2 position zone focus
- Top Plate: tan plastic with window for viewfinder
- Covering: dark brown crackle paint
- Bellows: black, self erecting scissor struts
- Film: 3000 speed B&W only


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